Mittal Teas blog on importance of water for making tea

Water is the Soul of Tea

Being a tea businesses person, and especially because of personally being there at our tea house in Sunder Nagar or Barakhamba Road, we get first hand feedback from tea lovers from different cultures, countries and most importantly with a subjective palette. We strive day and night to hand pick tea batches that are nothing but the best, but when you get a not so good feedback, it is definitely not a “Friday feeling”.

To our surprise, 8 out of 10 of those feedbacks came from people who were using water UNFIT for tea! Yes, I agree, in this day and age, we assume that the water in our home and workplace is just fine. But you are about to discover something new just now.

Here are the different types of water and how they impact our teas:

  1. Tap Water: The hardness depends on the ground water and thus varies from region to region. This water is rich in the ENEMY of tea, namely Chlorine. This chlorine is bound to alter the authentic aroma of the tea.
  2. Filtered Water: This is definitely better than Tap Water. Although it is not nearly perfect. Filtered water will again take the help of charcoal to trap the chlorine and calcium. Although the aroma will not be too affected, the taste in this case, might vary. Consider heating this water (do not boil) and letting it cool. If it still tastes like some minerals, you need to abandon this water brewing tea.
  3. Mineral or Bottled Water: Here there 2 types – one that is rich in minerals and one that is not. Choose the latter. Reason being simple – the minerals will again meddle with the tea constituents in terms of the flavor or aroma.

Common myths:

a. Boiling the water will solve all miseries: As the water starts to boil, turn off the kettle. As much as you boil it, the more oxygen will be lost. Oxygen is very important for any type of tasting as it enables the aroma compounds to reach our nasal passage.

b. Adding more lead = more taste: the amount of tanning must be in balance, failing which, the might become bitter or astringent. The standard 2g per cup i.e 150mL.

c. Longer brew time = bitter disappointment: Most people are clueless about how long to brew a certain type of tea. But most people also have a tendency to extract the most out of the tea leaves by leaving them in water longer. This is almost like overcooking your meal.

Hope this article was helpful in understanding the impact and importance of water used for teas. As it is commonly said, “God is in the detail” as well as “Devil is in the detail”, meaning – a very small detail like this, can either make your tea terrible or make it heavenly.

#LetsMakeTeaTimeGreatAgain

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